Sources of stress in high performance healthcare organization: A study comparing intensive care and general ward nurses

  • Tamoor Gill Shifa International Hospitals Ltd., Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Gideon Victor Shifa College of Nursing, Shifa Tameer-e-Millat University, Islamabad, Pakistan https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6307-941X
  • Raisa Kousar Shifa International Hospitals Ltd., Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Noman Iqbal Department of Nursing, Islamabad Nursing College, Islamabad, Pakistan
Keywords: Stress, nurses, intensive care, general ward

Abstract

Objective: To compare stressors of nurses working in intensive care units and general wards of a high-performance health care organization.

Methodology: A comparative cross-sectional survey was conducted. Using stratified random sampling, 121 intensive care and 121 general ward nurses, cumulatively 242 were offered to participate in the study. IRB and EC approvals were obtained. A self-administered questionnaire with structured responses was used for data collection. The data were analyzed for descriptive and inferential statistics in SPSS 23.

Results: The study participants were predominantly 152(62.8%) female; 182(75.2%) having diploma in nursing and 169(69.8%) RN-I; 38(31.4%) intensive care and 35(28.9%) general ward nurse who were performing 12-hours shift duty; 50(41.3%) intensive care and 65(51.2%) general ward nurses were dissatisfied with their salary. The average patients assigned to intensive care nurse were two and six to a general ward nurse. Independent t-test and ANOVA revealed significant difference of stressors in intensive versus general ward nurses, gender, working hours, satisfaction with salary, professional qualification, experience and shift work (P-Value <0.05). Common stressors were unclear demands, pressured to work long hours, not having control at workplace and being not able to talk to line managers about something that has upset or annoyed them at workplace.

Conclusion: The general ward nurses face more stressors than intensive care units’ nurses. Workplace stressors could compromise healthy working environment and patient safety whereas favorable environment could increase job satisfaction, staff productivity, and quality of care. Workplace-oriented stress management strategies must be adopted.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Moustaka Å, Constantinidis TC. Sources and effects of Work-related stress in nursing. Health Sci J. 2010; 4(4):210-16.

Beck CT. Secondary traumatic stress in nurses: A systematic review. Arch of Psychiatr Nurs. 2011; 25(1):1-10.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnu.2010.05.005

Chang A, Kicis J, Sangha G. Effect of the clinical support nurse role on work-related stress for nurses on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit. J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2007; 24(6):340-49.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1043454207308065

Cavalheiro AM, Moura Junior DF, Lopes AC. Stress in nurses working in intensive care units. Rev Lat Am Enfermagem. 2008; 16(1):29-35.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1590/S0104-11692008000100005

Rasmussen K, Pedersen AHM, Pape L, Mikkelsen KL, Madsen MD, Nielsen KJ. Work environment influences adverse events in an emergency department. Dan Med J. 2014; 61(5)4812.

Preto VA, Pedrão LJ. Stress among nurses who work at the intensive care unit. Rev Esc Enferm USP. 2009; 43(4):838-45.

Zainiyah S, Yahya S, IM A, Chow C. Stress and its associated factors amongst ward nurses in a public hospital Kuala Lumpur. Malaysian J Pub Health Med. 2011; 11(1):78-85.

Zhang A, Tao H, Ellenbecker CH, Liu X. Job satisfaction in mainland China: comparing critical care nurses and general ward nurses. J Adv Nurs. 2013; 69(8):1725-36.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.12033

Applebaum D, Fowler S, Fiedler N, Osinubi O, Robson M. The impact of environmental factors on nursing stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. J Nurs Adm. 2010; 40:323-28.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1097/NNA.0b013e3181e9393b

Rosenstein AH, O’daniel M. Disruptive Behavior & Clinical Outcomes: Perceptions of Nurses & Physicians: Nurses, physicians, and administrators say that clinicians’ disruptive behavior has negative effects on clinical outcomes. Nurs Manag. 2005; 36(1):18-28.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1097/00006247-200501000-00008

Health and Safety Executives. Managing the causes of work-related stress: A step-by-step approach using the Management Standards. 2nd ed. London: Crown; 2007.

Masa’Deh R, Alhalaiqa F, AbuRuz ME, Al-Dweik G, Al-Akash HY. Perceived stress in nurses: A comparative study. Glob J Health Sci. 2017; 9(6):195-203.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v9n6p195

Rasmussen K, Pedersen AH, Pape L, Mikkelsen KL, Madsen MD, Nielsen KJ. Work environment influences adverse events in an emergency department. Dan Med J. 2014; 61(5):A4812.

Trousselard M, Dutheil F, Naughton G, Cosserant S, Amadon S, Dualé C. et. al. Stress among nurses working in emergency, anesthesiology and intensive care units depends on qualification: a Job Demand-Control survey. Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016; 89(2):221-29.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-015-1065-7

Olivares-Faúndez VE, Gil-Monte PR, Mena L, Jélvez-Wilke C, Figueiredo-Ferraz H. Relationships between burnout and role ambiguity, role conflict and employee absenteeism among health workers. Ter Psicol. 2014; 32(2):111-20.

Qin Z, Zhong X, Ma J, Lin H. Stressors affecting nurses in China. Contem Nurs. 2016; 52(4):447-53.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/10376178.2016.1221321

Weston MJ. Strategies for enhancing autonomy and control over nursing practice. Online J Issues Nurs. 2010; 15(1).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3912/OJIN.Vol15No01Man02

Tillott S, Walsh K, Moxham L. Encouraging engagement at work to improve retention. Nurs Manag. 2013; 19(10):27-31.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.7748/nm2013.03.19.10.27.e697

Ganz FD, Levy H, Khalaila R, Arad D, Bennaroch K, Kolpak O. et al. Bullying and Its Prevention Among Intensive Care Nurses. J Nurs Scholarsh. 2015; 47(6):505-11.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jnu.12167

Duffield C, Diers D, O'Brien-Pallas L, Aisbett C, Roche M, King M. et al. Nursing staffing, nursing workload, the work environment and patient outcomes. Appl Nurs Res. 2011; 24(4):244-55.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnr.2009.12.004

Watson S, Arulampalam W, Petrou S, Marlow N, Morgan A, Draper ES. et al. The effects of a one-to-one nurse-to-patient ratio on the mortality rate in neonatal intensive care: a retrospective, longitudinal, population-based study. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2016; 101:195-200.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2015-309435

Daiski I. Changing nurses’ dis-empowering relationship patterns. J Adv Nur. 2004; 48(1):43-50.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2004.03167.x

Collis J. Adverse effects of overcrowding on patient experience and care: John Collis presents the findings of a systematic literature review of how the number of people in emergency departments affects service delivery. Emerg Nurs. 2010; 18(8):34-39.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.7748/en2010.12.18.8.34.c8152

Purpora C, Blegen MA. Job satisfaction and horizontal violence in hospital staff registered nurses: the mediating role of peer relationships. J Clin Nurs. 2015; 24(15-16):2286-94.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.12818

Jones G, Hocine M, Salomon J, Dab W, Temime L. Demographic and occupational predictors of stress and fatigue in French intensive-care registered nurses and nurses' aides: a cross-sectional study. Int J Nurs Stud. 2015; 52(1):250-59.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.07.015

Al-Makhaita HM, Sabra AA, Hafez AS. Predictors of work-related stress among nurses working in primary and secondary health care levels in Dammam, Eastern Saudi Arabia. J Family Community Med. 2014; 21(2):79.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4103/2230-8229.134762

Published
2020-08-09
How to Cite
1.
Gill T, Victor G, Kousar R, Iqbal N. Sources of stress in high performance healthcare organization: A study comparing intensive care and general ward nurses. JSTMU [Internet]. 9Aug.2020 [cited 22Oct.2020];3(1):3 -9. Available from: https://j.stmu.edu.pk/ojs/index.php/jstmu/article/view/64